Robert E. Lee

via: Patriot Post

Today we take a moment to remember the birth anniversary of Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), one of the greatest military commanders in American history. He was also a great man of faith who gave his all for the cause of liberty and states’ rights.

There were many honorable men of the Confederate States of America, whose objective was, first and foremost, the protection of states rights, and decidedly not the continuation of abhorrent institution of slavery. For a better understanding on the issues of the day, read this perspective on Abraham Lincoln, which was not included in your grade-school civics class. The honor we give these men has its roots in the founding of this great nation.

Mark Alexander notes in his essay, “Lincoln’s Legacy at 200,” that “the causal case for states’ rights is most aptly demonstrated by the words and actions of Gen. Lee, who detested slavery and opposed secession. In 1860, however, Gen. Lee declined President Abraham Lincoln’s request that he take command of the Army of the Potomac, saying that his first allegiance was to his home state of Virginia: ‘I have, therefore, resigned my commission in the army, and save in defense of my native state… I hope I may never be called on to draw my sword.’ He would, soon thereafter, take command of the Army of Northern Virginia, rallying his officers with these words: ‘Let each man resolve to be victorious, and that the right of self-government, liberty, and peace shall find him a defender.'”

Advertisements

3 Comments

Filed under Patriot Post

3 responses to “Robert E. Lee

  1. nhiemstra

    This was a re-post from another website, the Patriot Post (I did provide the link). But you made a comment I don’t think you can support. You said, “All of the readers of this blog . . .” Actually, you were the only one asking for the info, and looking on the Patriot Post’s website, I did not see anyone asking for it.

  2. Tom Forehand, jr.

    Mark, you noted:

    “Lee admirer Elizabeth Pryor wrote a fawning biography of Lee, but she also shows amazing things about Lee, from his own handwritten account books, and his own personal papers. For example, Lee paid six times his normal bounty to capture one of his many escaped slaves — this one a mulatto girl, about 14 years old. He paid six time the bounty to capture her, then had her tortured. He screamed at her during her whipping.”

    Paying six times more for the recovery of these runaways does not prove Lee had anyone whipped. The only eye-witness who ever claimed that Lee had anyone whipped (as far as I know) and who put his name on the line to make this accusation was Wesley Norris. However, Norris, and probably other Arllington slaves, were aggravated at Lee because he did not free them as soon as they thought they should have been freed. For this reason, it is possible that they exaggerated the details of this event to make falsely appear that Lee had slaves whipped.

    So, if you could, please present the other unbias evidence that Lee had anyone whipped at any time. All of the readers of this blog would like to see such evidence. It is easy to allege that Lee had someone whipped; it is much more difficult to prove it — especially if he never did.

    Thanks,
    Tom Forehand, Jr.

  3. Althought Lee himself did not sign off on the Southern ULtimatums, Lee chose the side that issued the Southern ULtimatums. All five of the Southern Ultimatums were violenty anti -states rights. All five ULtimatums specifically said states had no right whatsoever, to decide any issue about blacks, or slaves, or civil rights, even within their own states.

    The SOuthern Ultimatums should be studied in every history class in the US. The Ultimatums were announced loudly and proudly by Southern newspapers, reporting on what Southern leaders demanded.

    Was Lee for state’s rights? As an excuse to torture slaves, yes he was.

    Lee admirer Elizabeth Pryor wrote a fawning biography of Lee, but she also shows amazing things about Lee, from his own handwritten account books, and his own personal papers.

    For example, Lee paid six times his normal bounty to capture one of his many escaped slaves — this one a mulatto girl, about 14 years old. He paid six time the bounty to capture her, then had her tortured. He screamed at her during her whipping.

    What did he do with the girl’s white looking infant? He apparently SOLD the white looking baby.

    Lee’s slaves all hated him, admits Pryor. She excuses Lee’s torture of slave girls by saying it was due to his “poor cross cultural communication”. And, almost idiotically she claims “Lee did not appreciate his slave’s desire to be free.”

    How could he NOT appreciate it? He hired bounty hunters and tortured the slaves that dared try to run away! He promised the slaves torture, and then he had them tortured.

    Lee sshould not have kept meticulous notes, in his own handwriting, because these will forever expose the myth that Southern “historians” have fabricated, then embellished, for 150 years.

    Go see http://leepapers.blogspot.com/, or read the book “Reading the Man” by Elizabeth Pryor.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s