Cars Will be Made in the U.S.

The Wall Street Journal ran a great article on those ‘other’ car manufacturers we have in the U.S. The takeaway:

These are the 12 “foreign,” or so-called transplant, producers making cars across America’s South and Midwest. Toyota, BMW, Kia and others now make 54% of the cars Americans buy. The internationals also employ some 113,000 Americans, compared with 239,000 at U.S.-owned carmakers, and several times that number indirectly.

The international car makers aren’t cheering for Detroit’s collapse. Their own production would be hit if such large suppliers as the automotive interior maker Lear were to go down with a GM or Chrysler. They fear, as well, a protectionist backlash. But by the same token, a government lifeline for Detroit punishes these other companies and their American employees for making better business decisions.

The root of this other industry’s success is no secret. In fact, Detroit has already adopted some of its efficiency and employment strategies, though not yet enough. To put it concisely, the transplants operate under conditions imposed by the free market. Detroit lives on Fantasy Island.

There’s no natural law that America must have a Detroit automotive industry, any more than steel had to be made for all time in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania or textiles in New England. Britain sold off all its car plants to foreigners and was no less an advanced economy as a result, though it was a healthier one. Detroit may yet adjust to avoid destruction in the best spirit of American capitalism. The other American car industry is a model for how to do it.”

Pat Buchanan made the protectionist argument on Hardball with Chris Matthews and our own Senior Research Fellow James Gattuso appropriately disproves it. Grant Bosse has it right when he says,

Bailing out the Big Three is subsidizing failure. And you only subsidize something when you want more of it.”

FYI, Honda opened up a new plant in Indiana just two weeks ago.

Found @ Heritage Foundry

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